Repairs on the Atari 2600: Silicone feet, EVA dust protection, Rust removal and other

In this article I talk about some repairs in the Atari 2600 the Polivoks with American Board Rev. 17, I acquired, with the intention of installing a against 2600Tim RGB Worhington.

The first was the Sears repair that hold the plate. Plastic resection and the locks were broken. To fix the problem I used a q-tip and Rod Epoxy glue.

New locks for the Atari Board 2600, made with cotton swab and Rod epoxy glue.

New locks for the Atari Board 2600, made with cotton swab and epoxy rod.

New locks for the Atari Board 2600, made with cotton swab and Rod epoxy glue.

New locks for the Atari Board 2600, made with cotton swab and epoxy rod.

New locks for the Atari Board 2600, made with cotton swab and Rod epoxy glue.

New locks for the Atari Board 2600, made with cotton swab and epoxy rod.

New locks for the Atari Board 2600, made with cotton swab and epoxy rod.

New locks for the Atari Board 2600, made with cotton swab and epoxy rod.

The second repair was in rubber feet. They were already very worn, so that the plastic housing was in direct contact with the surface, leaving the console released and ruining the carcass.

To resolve this problem, I cleaned well what's left of the rubber feet with isopropyl alcohol. About them, pasted silicone feet, actually silicone adhesives sold in store of material for joinery. Are typically used to lessen the impact on the closing of doors and drawers, but also do very well the service as feet.

Silicone adhesives will be the new Atari's feet 2600

Silicone adhesives will be the new Atari's feet 2600

Silicone adhesive as new foot on the Atari 2600.

Silicone adhesive as new foot on the Atari 2600.

Silicone adhesive as new foot on the Atari 2600.

Silicone adhesive as new foot on the Atari 2600.

Silicone adhesive as new foot on the Atari 2600.

Silicone adhesive as new foot on the Atari 2600.

Another problem in this Atari 2600 is that dust protections switches were pretty crappy. I don't know if they were originals or if someone had already stirred in them, but they were small and plastic circles.

To fix the problem I bought an EVA foam sheet and a measure of the type that I wore at school (Kids today still use this?) to make the circles. Cut out circles with scissors and did the new dust protections. They weren't as plump as well, but with the closed console is perfect.

Por fim, I decided to clean the switches, they were pretty bad. Apparently they are brushed aluminum, so I used a steel sponge (Bombril) to let them shining like new.

I also used steel wool to remove various points of plate oxidation, especially in the parts that are in contact with the metal plate interference protection. The metal plate had also several points of rust that were removed with steel wool and with the Dremel.

EVA foam sheet and compass.

EVA foam sheet and compass.

Dust protections made with EVA foam.

Dust protections made with EVA foam.

Plate with original dust protections.

Plate with original dust protections.

Plate with the new dust protections and brushed switches.

Plate with the new dust protections and brushed switches.

And so it was that my Atari 2600 the Polivoks with American Board Rev. 17 was more presentable. In the next articles of the series I'll show you how was the installation of the against 2600Tim RGB Worhington, that left this Atari 2600 with the best image of Atari 2600 I've ever seen. Stand by ...

Permanent link to this article: https://www.skooterblog.com/2017/09/07/reparos-no-atari-2600-pes-de-silicone-protecao-de-po-de-eva-remocao-de-oxidacao-e-outros/

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