Atari 2600: Installing the Mod 2600RGB-Part 2

In this article I give continuity in the series about the installation of the 2600RGB Kit in a Atari 2600 the Polivoks with American Board Rev. 17.

For those who haven't read, I recommend reading the previous articles to better understand this contract:

In this part of the series I will treat exclusively from the hole in the housing Atari 2600 to install the new connectors, the pause button and change of palette and the LED indicating when the console is connected. The latter is not part of the 2600RGB Kit, but I put on my own.

Remember again that I'm usually against this type of modification on consoles. I like to keep the originality of things. As I said in a previous article, in my childhood I listened too colleagues say: "If this were my bike/moped I took the stickers.", "If this was my car I took the ice and let the wheels exposed". I was always the guy who disagreed with all of this on the grounds take originality. And don't even talk to me about cars relegated… An engineer spends years to design a comfortable car, insurance, stable for a Joe Alley and demote the car, leaving as comfortable as a wagon.

Ultimately, I just decided to make against in this Atari 2600 because the quality of sound and image is huge. I would never do only aesthetic changes. And I have two other Atari 2600, being other Rev. 17 and a with Polivoks Board, in which I intend to move.

As for the hurricanes on housing, despite mods I think they should be avoided at all costs. If all the changes I made in the inner plate are reversible, the same cannot be said about hurricanes in housing. Today I believe that the ideal would be to pass a cable with all new signals for RF cable exit hole and mount the new outputs, button, LED, etc. in an external box. With the experience acquired, If I were to redo the against I probably would use a solution like this, with an armored sleeve cable DB15 connectors or something, keeping the body intact. But at the time, without any experience with mods, I thought it best to follow the tutorial, because I had already bought the SCART cable to the outputs 2600RGB kit standards.

So, I strongly recommend that no one leaves sticking around Islands. I don't want this article to be an incentive for somebody to do that. It's bad enough that people of the free market that destroys classic consoles to shove a Raspberry Pi inside. There are many cute substrates for Raspberry Pi, including some imitating classic consoles. Anyone who has any appreciation for classic consoles should pass too far from these sellers.

Done all this Disclaimer, the following are the changes I made in the console housing, for documentation purposes. All hurricanes were made with the Screwdriver-drill Bosch 12V battery GSR 120-LI and one of the 3 Scheduled drills 3-12 mm, 4-12mm and 4-20 mm of Titanium, more precisely of 3-12mm. These equipments have already been shown here in Skooter Blog.

The carcass of the Atari 2600 and the screwdriver, all ready to start.

The carcass of the Atari 2600 and the screwdriver, all ready to start.

Screwdriver drill staggered installed.

Screwdriver drill staggered installed.

The first hole I did was for the button that used to break and change of palette. I opted for a little button square and black, to be very discreet on the underside of the console. Easily accessible and hardly noticed. Note that o 2600RGB Kit does not come with the button for this purpose. Got this key in Cold Welding, I've said it here in Skooter Blog.

Hole in the casing of the Atari 2600 for the pause button and change of palette.

Hole in the casing of the Atari 2600 for the pause button and change of palette.

Hole in the casing of the Atari 2600 for the pause button and change of palette.

Hole in the casing of the Atari 2600 for the pause button and change of palette.

The pause button and change of palette already installed.

The pause button and change of palette already installed.

The pause button and change of palette already installed.

The pause button and change of palette already installed.

Then, I made the hole for the audio jack. Then I used a masonry drill to wear a little plastic, Once the screw jack is short. This wear must be done manually, without the screwdriver.

Hole for the jack audio P2.

Hole for the jack audio P2.

Drill to wear a little round hole.

Drill to wear a little round hole.

Hole for the jack audio P2.

Hole for the jack audio P2.

The first didn't. Broca um pouco maior para desgastar um pouco em volta do furo.

The first didn't. Broca um pouco maior para desgastar um pouco em volta do furo.

Hole for the jack audio P2.

Hole for the jack audio P2.

Hole for the jack audio P2.

Hole for the jack audio P2.

Jack P2 de áudio instalado.

Jack P2 de áudio instalado.

Jack P2 de áudio instalado.

Jack P2 de áudio instalado.

O próximo furo foi para o jack mini DIN para a saída de vídeo RGB. Esse é mais simples.

Furo para o jack mini DIN, para a saída RGB.

Furo para o jack mini DIN, para a saída RGB.

Plug mini DIN apenas colocado no furo. Attention: a orientação está incorreta.

Plug mini DIN apenas colocado no furo. Attention: a orientação está incorreta.

Plug mini DIN apenas colocado no furo. Attention: a orientação está incorreta.

Plug mini DIN apenas colocado no furo. Attention: a orientação está incorreta.

Logo depois, fiz o furo para o jack S-Video, also simple.

Mini DIN jacks and S-Video placed in holes. Attention: a orientação do jack mini DIN está incorreta.

Mini DIN jacks and S-Video placed in holes. Attention: a orientação do jack mini DIN está incorreta.

Mini DIN jacks and S-Video placed in holes.

Mini DIN jacks and S-Video placed in holes.

Os furos dos jacks mini DIN e S-Video.

Os furos dos jacks mini DIN e S-Video.

Mini DIN jacks and S-Video placed in holes.

Mini DIN jacks and S-Video placed in holes.

Mini DIN jacks and S-Video placed in holes.

Mini DIN jacks and S-Video placed in holes.

Mini DIN jacks and S-Video placed in holes.

Mini DIN jacks and S-Video placed in holes.

O último furo que fiz foi para o LED que indica quando o console está ligado. Coloquei um suporte para LED nele.

Suporte de LED instalado no Atari 2600.

Suporte de LED instalado no Atari 2600.

Suporte de LED instalado no Atari 2600.

Suporte de LED instalado no Atari 2600.

Agora era hora de colar os jacks mini DIN e S-Video. Para isso usei a Super Glue epoxy fast cure (8 Minutes). Colei uma fita crepe pelo lado de fora para manter os jacks no lugar. Em seguida misturei as duas partes da cola e apliquei.

Fita crepe para segurar os jacks no lugar.

Fita crepe para segurar os jacks no lugar.

 

Super Glue epoxy fast cure (8 Minutes)

Super Glue epoxy fast cure (8 Minutes)

Depois de algumas horas, o resultado. Escorreu um pouco de cola, acho que exagerei na dose, mas fica pelo ladro de dentro, então tudo bem.

Jacks S-Video e mini DIN já colados.

Jacks S-Video e mini DIN já colados.

Segurei a ansiedade e deixei a cola secar bem antes de fazer as soldas nos jacks. Só voltei ao console dois dias depois. Para quem esperou quase 40 dias pela chegada das brocas escalonadas, dois dias foi pouco. 🙂

Você pode estar se perguntando sobre o furo para o jack RCA, usado para o vídeo composto, afinal eu já havia até soldado esse plug na placa. But, na hora de fazer a furação achei que aquele jack não iria ficar legal na carcaça do Atari 2600. Enquanto os outros 3 jacks ficam rentes a carcaça, o jack RCA é um tanto saliente. Optei por não instala-lo nesse momento, pelo menos até achar um jack mais adequado. De qualquer forma deixei o jack RCA com a ligação elétrica feita, mas dentro do console.

Want to see how the images of the Atari 2600 in RGB? Then wait for the next parts of this series. Share with your friends if you liked. And sign the Skooter Blog to receive new articles by email.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.skooterblog.com/2017/11/04/atari-2600-instalando-o-mod-2600rgb-parte-2/

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